How do I search in specific segments?

In Lexis Advance®, all documents of the same type have a common structure, composed of the natural parts or divisions referred to as segments.

You can restrict your search to a specific part or segment of a document, such as the court that heard the case or the judge who wrote the opinion. Different types of documents have different segments. For example, a case doesn't have the same segments as a newspaper article.

To search in a specific segment, you can use the Advanced Search form (look for the link right above the search box), or type the segment name followed by your search terms in parentheses in the search box. This example uses the "name" segment for searching by party name:

name(griggs and duke)

Segment searching is especially useful when you are looking for:

  • Opinions written by a particular judge
  • Cases involving a specific party
  • Cases in which a particular attorney or firm appeared as counsel

Which segments are searchable in Lexis Advance?

Lexis Advance does not search all of the same content types or segments as Lexis® (lexis.com). Below is the list of content types that you can currently search with a segment search using Lexis Advance. Click a content type to see which segments are available for it.

Note: These specialized search commands will help you find the right news articles:
  • ALLCAPS finds acronyms and other words in all caps. For example, allcaps(AIDS) finds ACQUIRED IMMUNE DEFICIENCY SYNDROME or AIDS but not the verb “aids.”
  • NOCAPS finds words without caps. For example, nocaps(aids) focuses on the verb but doesn’t find AIDS.
  • CAPS finds words with initial caps. To limit your search to Puerto Rico and not the RICO Act, enter: Puerto caps(Rico).

These commands work in News content only.

To see a list of all the segments condensed in table format, view Segments in Lexis Advance and scroll to the second page.

Searching in a Specific Segment

  1. In the search box, enter your search, beginning with the segment name and followed by your search terms in parentheses. To find opinions written by Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, enter: writtenby(o'connor)
  2. Click Search.

    Segment searches can be run as either a natural language or a Boolean search, depending on the search syntax you use. The table below has examples of segment searches using natural language and Boolean syntax.

    To Find...Type This
    News articles that mention Lincoln in the headline, that are longer than 2500 words, using Boolean syntaxheadline(lincoln) and length > 2500
    Cases when you know the party names, using natural languagename(griggs duke)
    A legal news story when you know the headline, using natural languageheadline(michael jackson death)
    Cases when you know the party names, using Boolean syntaxname(griggs and duke)
    Cases involving the right to counsel and heard by either Judge Anderson or Judge Markey, using Boolean syntaxright to counsel and judges(anderson or markey)
    Cases argued by Jensen for which Posner wrote the opinion, using Boolean syntaxwrittenby(posner) and attorney(jensen)

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